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Rafflesia

Rafflesia

Rafflesia is a genus of flowering plants that is made up of of 16 known species. The best known of these species is Rafflesia arnoldii, which has the distinction of being the world's largest flower, reaching a diameter of about three feet. The Rafflesia flowers have been found only in Indonesia - on the islands of Sumatra and Java - and Malaysia, in particular in the East Malaysian states of Sabah and Sarawak. All of the known species of Rafflesia are threatened or endangered.

Chinese New Year

Chinese New Year

Chinese New Year is the most important of the traditional Chinese holidays. This goes for the Chinese population in Malaysia too where the day itself is declared a public holiday. For Chinese locals the new year means a new start where they can make new money and attract new businesses. At numerous locations in Malaysia people light fireworks during the celebrations. Chinese New Year is the only day in the year most of the shops are closed for business.

Airport Taxi at KLIA

Airport Taxi at KLIA

Though using the KLIA Express is a quicker way to reach Kuala Lumpur city center, using the airport taxi is a much easier way to reach your destination within Kuala Lumpur. KLIA Express only brings you to KL Sentral while the airport taxi drops you off right in front of your hotel. If you are traveling alone it might be too expensive compared to other options as you pay RM74.30 for a ticket. You can buy tickets for a fixed price at one of the taxi counters at Kuala Lumpur International Airport.

Food in Malaysia

Food in Malaysia

If shopping is the national pastime in Malaysia, then food is the national obsession. It is not uncommon to be greeted by the phrase 'Sudah makan?' (Have you eaten already?). Everything in Malaysia revolves around great food. Pleasant social get-togethers are always combined with having a nice meal. In Malaysia, more people blog about food than about anything else. Locals usually never eat at home; unless it is with family. Everybody eats outdoors every night; Malaysia is all about food!

Multi cultural Malaysia

Multi cultural Malaysia

Three main populations live in Malaysia; Malays, Chinese and Indians. All populations live together in harmony, though of course there are tensions every now and then but tourists will usually not notice that much of this. Over half of the population is of Malay descent; the Chinese form almost a quarter of the total population. Malaysians of Indian descent form approximately 7% of the population; while all indigenous people combined form about 11% of the total population in Malaysia.

Monsoon in Malaysia

Is there a monsoon season affecting certain attractions and destinations within Malaysia?

Usually the first question you ask when organizing a holiday trip to Malaysia is: What is the best period to visit the country. Malaysia is the perfect destination throughout the whole year. In countries with a tropical climate it’s obvious that it rains once in a while. Most of the time this is a short (heavy) period, and before you know it the sun already shines. When it comes to the rainy seasons 3 different regions can be distinguished in Malaysia, namely the eastern side and western side of the peninsula and Borneo.

Bad weather in Malaysia (pictures from Kuala Lumpur)

To the western side of the peninsula of Malaysia there’s hardly a rainy season or monsoon. This is because of the moderate climate at the Andaman Sea. Here Malaysia is protected by the Indonesian island of Sumatra for a great part. Along the western side of the peninsula the weather can of course be a little bad. It can sometimes be a day with bad weather indeed, but most of the time there’s just a short and heavy shower at the end of the day (this is normal in the tropics). You can be quite sure that between 4 and 5 in the afternoon it rains persistently for about 10 to 30 minutes. As a matter of fact this is often very pleasant, a bit of cooling at the end of the day. Islands to the western side are: Penang, Langkawi and Pangkor amongst others. So here there’s hardly a serious rainy season, although, it’s not an inconvenience when you’re on holiday there. Kuala Lumpur is also on the western side and here there’s often a difference in the dry and wet periods. In such a great metropolis in a tropical climate it’s nice when there’s rain because this makes the air cleaner.

Bad weather during monsoon season in Malaysia (Top pictures from Langkawi, lower picture near Lake Kenyir)

The rainy season to the eastern side of the peninsula is in the period between October and March and can be quite heavy; it sometimes rains days on end then. Resorts on islands like Perhentian, Redang and Tioman are often closed in this period, because the sea can be very wild and a passage with the ferry can be difficult. All the beauty of the bounty islands has disappeared for a while. Cities like Kota Bharu, Kuala Terengganu and Kuantan are also less attractive to visit during this period. Around Kuantan there can sometimes be floods in this period. Apart from that, every year is different, sometimes it rains for weeks in a row, other times the weather can be beautiful for a couple of days.

The rainy season on Borneo is in the period of October to February; although in this last month it doesn’t rain as much as in the remaining months. A shower is short and fierce most of the times and before you know it the sun shines again. The islands to the northwestern side of Borneo have to deal now and then with the ‘tail’ of typhoons from the Philippines. This unloads itself in heavy wind and rainfall.

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1 comments on Monsoon in Malaysia

  1. J
    11 months ago
    July 7, 2016 at 10:33 pm

    You didn’t get the 5-7 days of continuous torrential rain? I must have been in another Malaysia then.

    Reply

11 Pingbacks & Trackbacks on Monsoon in Malaysia

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